Trump news – live: Ex-president claims to be ‘most persecuted person’ in US history at TPUSA summit – The Independent

Former president rallied in North Carolina after he was hit with blockbuster lawsuit
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Former president Donald Trump claims he can declassify top secret documents just ‘by thinking about it’
Donald Trump tore into New York Attorney General Letitia James at his campaign-style rally in North Carolina on Friday night, days after she filed a $250m lawsuit against the former president and his business empire for a host of allegedly fraudulent business practices.
Ahead of the rally, Mr Trump appeared to fall further into the world of QAnon after he reposted a video on his own Truth Social network containing images and slogans associated with the fringe conspiracy.
Mr Trump has previously denied having knowledge of the sprawling conspiracy theory but has amplified Q-supporting influencers and followers on his social media platform. At his rally, supporters raised their fingers in an apparent salute, continuing a trend at his events that security staff have tried to stop from happening.
His attorneys, meanwhile, have been ordered to say one way or the other whether they actually believe the FBI planted incriminating evidence in the documents seized from Mar-a-Lago – or whether the former president is merely bluffing to save face.
US Rep Adam Schiff, who sits on the House selecte committee investigating the Capitol attack, said that the US Department of Justice requested documents from the committee, what he called a “breathtaking” request.
“My first reaction was … why don’t you have your own damn files?” he said on Saturday, according to NBC News’s Ali Vitali. “Why haven’t you been conducting your own investigation?”
Trump aides were quick to deny that a song that has played at Trump rallies is a QAnon theme after playing a royalty-free track called “Mirrors” by composer Will Van De Crommert.
The song bears some resemblance to the song “Wwg1wga”, an abbreviation for the QAnon slogan “Where we go one, we go all.”
Mr Van De Crommert is not pleased with the association and has sought to distance himself from the campaign and conspiracy theorist movement
Writer says he is not happy with use of his song ‘Mirrors’ and disassociates from QAnon
Former US Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has refused to weigh in on the controversy surrounding Ginni Thomas’s involvement in efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election.
The now-retired Breyer told CNN that the wife of Justice Clarence Thomas can make her own decisions about her political activity and whether it could impact the nation’s highest court – as he insisted that he “likes” both her and his conservative counterpart.
“I don’t go through that in that I strongly believe that women who are wives, including wives of Supreme Court justices, have to make the decisions about how to lead their lives, careers, what kind of career, etc., for themselves,” he said.
Wife of Justice Clarence Thomas agreed this week to sit down for a voluntary interview with the January 6 committee
The White House has warned of “catastrophic, dangerous and unacceptable” consequences to follow a judge’s decision upholding Arizona’s 158-year-old anti-abortion law, initially drafted 48 years before Arizona was even a state.
In a statement on 24 September, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre warned the judge’s decision will “set Arizona women back more than a century.”
The state can enforce a 150-year-old abortion ban that predates statehood, judge rules
Ohio Republican congressional candidate JR Majewski wildly exaggerated his military and professional background, including record as a “combat veteran” in Afghanistan despite only serving six months loading planes far from any frontline battles.
During a press conference addressing the report on Friday, the Trump-backed GOP candidate insisted his military records are “classified”.
“The military record I have been able to obtain, from my personal files, shows that all of my deployments are listed as classified,” he said.
He claimed that the Associated Press report debunking his claims was an attempt to “defame” him with a “fake hit piece.”
The report says Mr Majrewski’s post-military career “has been defined by exaggerations, conspiracy theories, talk of violent action against the US government and occasional financial duress.”
Investors are pulling out of a plan from Digital World Acquisition Corp to acquire Trump’s social media platform Truth Social, according to the firm’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Digital World announce on Friday that it received termination notices from private investment in public equity investors ending nearly $139m in investments out of the $1bn commitment it had previously announced, according to Reuters.
Within the first few months of Trump’s Truth Social, the former president himself has shared 30 different QAnon-affiliated accounts dozens of times to his more than 4 million followers.
At least 88 accounts embedded within the sprawling QAnon delusion with more than 10,000 followers each are promoting Q-related slogans, graphics and messages widely across the platform. More than one third of those accounts were previously banned on Twitter.
From our report in August:
Conspiracy theorists are thriving on the Twitter clone, where Q influencers have thousands of followers and an audience with the former president
Trump’s ongoing baseless narrative that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him continues to dominate his public appearances and social media posts stringing together lies about voter fraud.
His latest rally was no exception, while also digging into his misogynistic disdain for women who have challenged him and openly courting QAnon conspiracy theorists who fuel his Truth Social platform.
The Independent’s Eric Garcia has the big takeaways from on the ground in North Carolina:
Senior Washington reporter Eric Garcia was on the ground at Trump’s rally in Wilmington, North Carolina. Here’s what he saw:
Donald Trump has openly courted QAnon influencers and supporters, who are raising their fingers in the air in an apparent salute referencing the sprawling conspiracy theory that baselessly asserts the 2020 presidential election was rigged, among other claims.
Lisa Pyle, who wore a hat with the Q symbol, told The Independent that she appreciated his use of QAnon symbolism.
“I think it’s wonderful,” she said.
She told The Independent’s chief Washington correspondent Eric Garcia that she likely would not vote in 2022: “Would you vote in a broken election if you knew? If you knew the truth?”
Ex-president has been posting flurry of QAnon memes on Truth Social
While a mob of Trump supporters stormed the hall of Congress, the White House switchboard reportedly connected a phone call to one of the rioters.
“I only know one end of that call,” Denver Riggleman, a technical adviser who worked with the congressional, told 60 Minutes. “I don’t know the White House end, which I believe is more important. But the thing is the American people need to know that there are link connections that need to be explored more.”
Mr Riggleman, a former military intelligence officer and Republican congressman from Virginia, is the author of a forthcoming book which argues the January 6 committee needed to further investigate communication records like the alleged White House call.
January 6 committee to release report later this year
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Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends a rally for North Carolina Republican nominee for U.S. Senate Ted Budd at Wilmington International Airport in Wilmington, North Carolina, U.S. September 23, 2022
REUTERS
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